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Troubleshooting Windows Fail-over Clusters and CSV

  • Generating the comprehensive Cluster Diagnostic Report;

Get-ClusterDiagnosticInfo

The above command Gets diagnostics for a cluster a cluster that contains VMs and produces a zip file containing the data.

Example:

PS C:\> Get-ClusterDiagnosticInfo -WriteToPath “C:\Users\MyUser\HealthTest\”

  • This cmdlet enables you to view the state of your CSV. Understanding the state of your CSV is useful in troubleshooting failures as well as optimizing the performance of your CSV.

Get-ClusterSharedVolumeState

The above command is really helpful when it comes to issues with the Cluster Shared Volumes. With this we can easily isolate the issue among the WSFC & Storage System. for more information….. 

[source: Microsoft]

Resetting the MS SQL sa Password – The Correct Way

If the user forgets the SQL password, then the user can ask the SQL SA (system administrator). It is because the SQL SA can easily reset the user’s password. But, what need to do if the administrator forgot the password?

Here is how to Resolve the issue;

Step 01

Try to Login into SQL Server using Windows Authentication (always try start with Run as Administrator)

If you can log into the SSMS, check whether SQL Server and Windows Authentication mode is enabled under the SQL server properties.

Continue reading “Resetting the MS SQL sa Password – The Correct Way” »

Form there, you will be able to enable the SA login if its disabled.

Also, using the command line you will be able to enable the SA login

net stop MSSQLSERVER

net start MSSQLSERVER /m”SQLCMD”

Also, you will have the chance to change the SA login password as follows (after accessing the SSMS);

GO

ALTER LOGIN [sa] WITH DEFAULT_DATABASE=[master]

GO

USE [master]

GO

ALTER LOGIN [sa] WITH PASSWORD=N’NewPassw0rd’

GO

 

Step 02

Access SQL Server Configuration Manager and confirm that all the SQL services and Network services are running, as below.

SQL Services

SQL Network Services

Step 03

Open an elevated Command Prompt

Stop the SQL Instance.  The default is MSSQLSERVER

net stop MSSQLSERVER

Start the SQL Instance in Single-User Mode

net start MSSQLSERVER /m”SQLCMD”

Get connected to the SQL instance

sqlcmd -SServerName\InstanceName

create a login called “TestUser” and give it the password “Password”

CREATE LOGIN TestUser WITH PASSWORD=’Password’

GO

Now, use more T-SQL commands to add the user to the SysAdmin role

SP_ADDSRVROLEMEMBER TestUser,’SYSADMIN’

GO

To exit SQLCMD, type ‘exit‘ and hit <ENTER>.  Next, stop the SQL instance and then start it again without the ‘/m‘ switch so it is no longer in Single-User Mode

net stop MSSQLSERVER && net start MSSQLSERVER

Now you should be able to access the SSMS with the newly created credentials.